C S Lewis

But the most obvious fact about praise – whether of God or anything – strangely escaped me. I thought of it in terms of compliment, approval, or the giving of honour. I had never noticed that all enjoyment spontaneously overflows into praise unless . . . shyness or the fear of boring others is deliberately brought in to check it. The world rings with praise – lovers praising their mistresses [Romeo praising Juliet and vice versa], readers their favourite poet, walkers praising the countryside, players praising their favourite game – praise of weather, wines, dishes, actors, motors, horses, colleges, countries, historical personages, children, flowers, mountains, rare stamps, rare beetles, even sometimes politicians or scholars

My whole, more general, difficulty about praise of God depended on my absurdly denying to us, as regards the supremely Valuable, what we delight to do, what indeed we can’t help doing, about everything else we value.

I think we delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment; it is its appointed consummation. It’s not out of compliment that lovers keep on telling one another how beautiful they are, the delight is incomplete till it is expressed.

17 August 2015 | 16:32 | No Comments


Clive James

I am much more interested in the great poem than great poetry.

16 August 2015 | 15:53 | No Comments


William James

Our science is a drop, our ignorance a sea.

12 August 2015 | 15:26 | No Comments


Alexis De Tocqueville

The American, is the Englishman left to himself.

4 August 2015 | 14:30 | No Comments


William Wilberforce

You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know.

31 July 2015 | 10:10 | No Comments


Nicholas Nassim Taleb

If you see fraud, and do not say fraud, you are a fraud.

21 July 2015 | 18:05 | No Comments


Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa

For things to remain the same, everything must change.

19 July 2015 | 15:36 | No Comments


George Orwell

England is perhaps the only great country whose intellectuals are ashamed of their own nationality. In left-wing circles it is always felt that there is something slightly disgraceful in being an Englishman and that it is a duty to snigger at every English institution, from horse racing to suet puddings. It is a strange fact, but it is unquestionably true that almost any English intellectual would feel more ashamed of standing to attention during “God save the King” than of stealing from a poor box.

3 July 2015 | 16:45 | No Comments


C S Lewis

Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.

14 June 2015 | 20:31 | No Comments


Tony Blair

The election in 2015 could be one in which a traditional left-wing party competes with a traditional right-wing party, with the traditional result

8 May 2015 | 20:57 | No Comments


Emily Dickinson

My friends are my estate.

26 April 2015 | 23:31 | No Comments


Richie Benaud

on leadership:

I think there are two aspects of it, I think it needs to be 90% luck and 10% skill but I give you a very strict warning don’t try it without the skill.

10 April 2015 | 23:31 | No Comments


C S Lewis

Prosperity knits a man to the world. He feels that he is finding his place in it, while really it is finding its place in him.

30 March 2015 | 6:15 | No Comments


Robert Burns

On Commissary Goldie’s Brains

Lord, to account who dares thee call,
Or e’er dispute thy pleasure?
Else why, within so thick a wall,
Enclose so poor a treasure?

29 March 2015 | 13:16 | No Comments


Walter Terence Stace

Religion can get on with any sort of astronomy, geology, biology, physics. But it cannot get on with a purposeless and meaningless universe. If the scheme of things is purposeless and meaningless, then the life of man is purposeless and meaningless too. Everything is futile, all effort is in the end worthless. A man may, of course, still pursue disconnected ends, money, fame, art, science, and may gain pleasure from them. But his life is hollow at the center. Hence the dissatisfied, disillusioned, restless, spirit of modern man.

28 March 2015 | 23:21 | No Comments


Mother Teresa (based on a text by Dr Kent Keith)

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered. Forgive them anyway.
If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives. Be kind anyway.
If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies. Succeed anyway.
If you are honest and sincere people may deceive you. Be honest and sincere anyway.
What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight. Create anyway.
If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous. Be happy anyway.
The good you do today, will often be forgotten. Do good anyway.
Give the best you have, and it will never be enough. Give your best anyway.
In the final analysis, it is between you and God. It was never between you and them anyway.

16 March 2015 | 17:36 | No Comments


Monsignor Ronald Knox

The 10 Rules of Detective Fiction

1. The criminal must be someone mentioned in the early part of the story, but must not be anyone whose thoughts the reader has been allowed to follow.
2. All supernatural or preternatural agencies are ruled out as a matter of course.
3. Not more than one secret room or passage is allowable.
4. No hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance which will need a long scientific explanation at the end.
5. No Chinaman must figure in the story.
6. No accident must ever help the detective, nor must he ever have an unaccountable intuition which proves to be right.
7. The detective must not himself commit the crime.
8. The detective must not light on any clues which are not instantly produced for the inspection of the reader.
9. The stupid friend of the detective, the Watson, must not conceal any thoughts which pass through his mind; his intelligence must be slightly, but very slightly, below that of the average reader.
10. Twin brothers, and doubles generally, must not appear unless we have been duly prepared for them.

1 March 2015 | 9:31 | No Comments


Miroslav Volf

To remember wrongdoing untruthfully is to act unjustly.

13 February 2015 | 23:58 | No Comments


Christopher Tolkien

Tolkien has become a monster, devoured by his own popularity and absorbed into the absurdity of our time. The chasm between the beauty and seriousness of the work, and what it has become, has overwhelmed me. The commercialization has reduced the aesthetic and philosophical impact of the creation to nothing. There is only one solution for me: to turn my head away.

3 February 2015 | 12:37 | No Comments


Avril Anderson

Drop English earth on him beneath
Do our sons; and their sons bequeath
His glories and our pride and grief
At Bladon.

For Lionheart that lies below
That feared not toil nor tears nor foe.
Let the oak stand tho’ tempests blow
At Bladon.

So Churchill sleeps, yet surely wakes
Old Warrior where the morning breaks
On sunlit uplands. But the heart aches
At Bladon.

30 January 2015 | 13:28 | No Comments


Adam Smith

People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.

22 January 2015 | 11:55 | No Comments


Cardinal Richelieu

Nothing is as dangerous for the state as those who would govern kingdoms with maxims found in books

20 January 2015 | 20:45 | No Comments


Publilius Syrus

Mighty rivers can be easily leaped at their source

16 January 2015 | 18:54 | No Comments


E E Cummings

be of love(a little)
More careful
Than of everything
guard her perhaps only
A trifle less
(merely beyond how very)
closely than
Nothing,remember love by
frequent
anguish(imagine
Her least never with most
memory)give entirely each
Forever its freedom
(Dare until a flower,
understanding sizelessly
sunlight
Open what thousandth why
and
discover laughing)

4 January 2015 | 13:57 | No Comments


C S Lewis

There are far, far better things ahead than any we leave behind.

1 January 2015 | 10:09 | No Comments


Frank Johnson

“Stravinsky (I think) said, in a most elaborate jibe, that ‘Richard Strauss is the Puccini of music’. Well, James Callaghan is the Harold Wilson of politics.”

27 December 2014 | 21:21 | No Comments


W H Auden

We would rather be ruined than changed

25 December 2014 | 21:16 | No Comments


Needles

Needles

21 December 2014 | 14:29 | No Comments


Robert Burns

Be Britain still to Britain true,
Among ourselves united;
For never but by British hands
Must British wrongs be righted!

18 September 2014 | 0:12 | No Comments


William Wilberforce

on the human condition

Truly we must pronounce him “majestic though in ruin”.

8 September 2014 | 9:05 | No Comments


Crispin’s Razor

In any argument every time the word “clearly” is used apply the following definition.

Clearly: (adverb) an incantation uttered in the hope that a reader or listener will not notice that, whilst the truth of the statement that follows it is essential to case being posited, there is in fact no evidence for the truth of that statement nor does it follow logically from any premise already established. Synonyms “undoubtedly”, “naturally”.

27 August 2014 | 5:17 | No Comments


Wanda Landowska (harpsichordist)

I never practice, I always play.

26 August 2014 | 15:12 | No Comments


Misunderstanding

“Your adorable” she texted
“No YOU’RE adorable” I texted back
and now she thinks I like her and all I was doing was correcting her English.

25 August 2014 | 20:59 | No Comments


Steve Jobs (in 1983)

[Apple’s] strategy is really simple. What we want to do is we want to put an incredibly great computer in a book that you can carry around with you and learn how to use in 20 minutes … and we really want to do it with a radio link in it so you don’t have to hook up to anything and you’re in communication with all of these larger databases and other computers.

24 August 2014 | 21:27 | No Comments


Milton Friedman

One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.

23 August 2014 | 11:45 | No Comments


H L Mencken

An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.

22 August 2014 | 19:06 | No Comments


Christian Bovee

Example has more followers than reason.

21 August 2014 | 17:10 | No Comments


Einstein and Chaplin (possibly)

Einstein: What I most admire about your art, is your universality. You don’t say a word, yet the world understands you.

Chaplin: It is true but your glory is even greater: The whole world admires you, even though they don’t understand a word of what you say.

19 August 2014 | 20:26 | No Comments


Sterling Hayden

To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen, who play with their boats at sea — “cruising,” it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

18 August 2014 | 20:10 | No Comments


Paul Krugman (in 1998)

The growth of the Internet will slow drastically, as the flaw in “Metcalfe’s law”–which states that the number of potential connections in a network is proportional to the square of the number of participants–becomes apparent: most people have nothing to say to each other! By 2005 or so, it will become clear that the Internet’s impact on the economy has been no greater than the fax machine’s.

17 August 2014 | 18:38 | No Comments


Francis Bacon

Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; morals, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.

16 August 2014 | 23:09 | No Comments


C S Lewis

The sun looks down on nothing half so good as a household laughing together over a meal.

15 August 2014 | 19:54 | No Comments


Tim Harford

As human freedoms go, the freedom to take your custom elsewhere is not a grand or noble one – but neither is it one that we should abandon without a fight.

14 August 2014 | 16:18 | No Comments


T S Eliot

Words strain,
Crack and sometimes break, under the burden,
Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
Decay with imprecision, will not stay in place,
Will not stay still.

13 July 2014 | 9:59 | No Comments


T E Lawrence

All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did.

31 May 2014 | 20:21 | No Comments


Tony Benn

If one meets a powerful person – Rupert Murdoch, perhaps, or Joe Stalin or Hitler – one can ask five questions: what power do you have; where did you get it; in whose interests do you exercise it; to whom are you accountable; and, how can we get rid of you? Anyone who cannot answer the last of those questions does not live in a democratic system.

14 March 2014 | 23:42 | No Comments


Kwesi Brew

The Mesh

We have come to the cross-roads
And I must either leave or come with you.
I lingered over the choice
But in the darkness of my doubts
You lifted the lamp of love
And I saw in your face
The road that I should take.

9 March 2014 | 0:50 | No Comments


C S Lewis

We are half-hearted creatures,
fooling about with drink and sex and
ambition when infinite joy is offered us,
like an ignorant child who wants to go on
making mud pies in a slum because he
cannot imagine what is meant by the offer
of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily
pleased.

7 March 2014 | 16:06 | No Comments


Tom Stoppard

14th March

Einstein born,
Quite unprepared,
For E to equal
MC squared

1 March 2014 | 2:46 | No Comments


Malcolm Muggeridge

The only ultimate disaster that can befall us, I have come to realise, is to feel ourselves to be at home here on earth.

28 January 2014 | 22:35 | No Comments


Rumi

Sell your cleverness and buy bewilderment

29 December 2013 | 14:21 | No Comments


David Coleman

If that had gone in, it would have been a goal.

22 December 2013 | 1:17 | No Comments


William Shakespeare

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard.
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.

6 December 2013 | 9:39 | No Comments


Ian Dury

The Bus Driver’s Prayer

Our Father,
Who art in Hendon
Harrow Road be Thy name
Thy Kingston come
Thy Wimbledon
In Erith as it is in Hendon.
Give us this day our Berkhamsted
And forgive us our Westminsters
As we forgive those who Westminster against us.

Lead us not into Temple Station
And deliver us from Ealing,
For thine is the Kingston
The Purley and the Crawley,
For Iver and Iver.
Crouch End.

28 November 2013 | 10:14 | No Comments


Thomas Hood

No sun – no moon!
No morn – no noon –
No dawn – no dusk – no proper time of day.
No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,
No comfortable feel in any member –
No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees,
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds! –
November!

27 November 2013 | 13:13 | No Comments


Stir Up Sunday (from the collect for the last Sunday before Advent)

Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

24 November 2013 | 10:57 | No Comments


C S Lewis

The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning

22 November 2013 | 15:35 | No Comments


Abraham Lincoln

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war; we are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this, but in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.

The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or to detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here; but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us here to be dedicated to the great task remaining before us; that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain. That the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that the government of the people, by the people and for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

20 November 2013 | 0:06 | No Comments


Ian McMillan

Lamb’s Conduit Street

A world in miniature; a universe in a grain of sand.
You can look from one end and see the other end.
You couldn’t call it majestic. It isn’t very grand
And yet I think it’s monumental. A nuanced blend
Of shops and popups and café’s you can pop in,
Slip out of carrying coffee that makes everything clear
And somehow this street quietens the city’s din
And concentrates the careworn mind to the sheer
Pleasure of simply walking down a welcoming street
That asks you to pause, take your time, have a look
And follow a different, independent, subtle beat.
Buy a shirt. Buy a croissant. Meet your mate. Buy a book.
I went there with my son and he turned to me and said
‘This is the perfect street. I’ll always live here in my head.’

13 November 2013 | 1:03 | No Comments


Christopher Logue

To a Friend in Search of Rural Seclusion

When all else fails,
Try Wales.

12 November 2013 | 10:30 | No Comments


Adam Smith

The frugality and industry of private people can repair the breaches which the extravagance of government makes in society’s capital.

29 October 2013 | 23:24 | No Comments


John Davidson

For she’s made of flint and roses, very odd;

15 October 2013 | 7:52 | No Comments


Leonardo da Vinci

It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.

10 October 2013 | 0:54 | No Comments


Calvin Coolidge (possibly)

Women sitting next to him at dinner: Oh Mr President my friend bet me I wouldn’t be able to get you to say three words to me tonight.

Coolidge: You lose

4 October 2013 | 9:27 | No Comments


Milton Friedman

We economists don’t know much, but we do know how to create a shortage. If you want to create a shortage of tomatoes, for example, just pass a law that retailers can’t sell tomatoes for more than two cents per pound. Instantly you’ll have a tomato shortage. It’s the same with oil or gas.

24 September 2013 | 16:39 | No Comments


Robert Browning

Meeting at Night

The grey sea and the long black land;
And the yellow half-moon large and low;
And the startled little waves that leap
In fiery ringlets from their sleep,
As I gain the cove with pushing prow,
And quench its speed i’ the slushy sand.

Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;
Three fields to cross till a farm appears;
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match,
And a voice less loud, thro’ its joys and fears,
Than the two hearts beating each to each.

23 September 2013 | 21:54 | No Comments


Elmore Leonard

10 Rules of Good Writing

1 Never open a book with weather.
2 Avoid prologues.
3 Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.
4 Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said” … he admonished gravely.
5 Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.
6 Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose.”
7 Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
8 Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
9 Don’t go into great detail describing places and things.
10 Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

The most important rule is one that sums up the 10, if it sounds like writing, rewrite it.

20 August 2013 | 16:15 | No Comments


T S Eliot

Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don’t mean to do harm — but the harm does not interest them. Or they do not see it, or they justify it because they are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves.

27 July 2013 | 11:13 | No Comments


Richard Rohr

To finally surrender ourselves to healing, we have to have three spaces opened within us – and all at the same time; our opinionated head, our closed down heart, and our defensive and defended body.

24 June 2013 | 8:14 | No Comments


William Douglas-Home

Smoke

Answer to the exam question “What is the future of coal?”

22 June 2013 | 23:17 | No Comments


William Morris (possibly)

Morris said to have spent much of his time in Paris in the Eiffel tower, painting, sketching, writing and taking many of his meals in its restaurant.

One of the restaurant staff noticed he was a regular visitor and said, “You are certainly impressed with our Tower, monsieur!”

“Impressed?!!” said Morris. “This is the only place in Paris where I can avoid seeing the thing!”

18 June 2013 | 23:13 | No Comments


G K Chesterton

We have all forgotten what we really are. All that we call common sense and rationality and practicality only means that, for certain dead levels of our life, we forget what we have forgotten. All that we call spirit and art and ecstasy only means that for one awful instant, we remember what we forgot

15 June 2013 | 11:28 | No Comments


C S Lewis

True Friendship is the least jealous of loves. Two friends delight to be joined by a third, and three by a fourth.

successfully tested for at least two further iterations

9 June 2013 | 20:27 | No Comments


Charles Mackay

Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one.

3 June 2013 | 18:20 | No Comments


Alan Leshner

The plural of ‘anecdote’ is not ‘evidence’

27 May 2013 | 22:03 | No Comments


On Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

A bishop interviewing Justin Welby when he first put himself forward for ordination:

I have interviewed a thousand candidates for ordination and you don’t come in the top thousand.

13 May 2013 | 10:47 | No Comments


Graffito

Things I hate
1) Vandalism
2) Irony
3) Lists

16 April 2013 | 23:58 | No Comments


Margaret Thatcher

I had applied for a job at Imperial Chemical Industries in 1948 and was called for a personal interview. However I failed to get selected. Many years later, I succeeded in finding out why I had been rejected. The remarks written by the selectors on my application were: “This woman is headstrong, obstinate and dangerously self-opinionated!”

9 April 2013 | 22:17 | No Comments


Michael Symmons Roberts

Jairus

So, God takes your child by the hand
and pulls her from her deathbed.
He says: ‘Feed her, she is ravenous.’

You give her fruits with thick hides
– pomegranate, cantaloupe –
food with weight, to keep her here.

You hope that if she eats enough
the light and dust and love
which weave the matrix of her body

will not fray, nor wear so thin
that morning sun breaks through her,
shadowless, complete.

Somehow this reanimation
has cut sharp the fear of death,
the shock of presence. Feed her

roast lamb, egg, unleavened bread:
forget the herbs, she has an aching
fast to break. Sit by her side,

split skins for her so she can gorge,
and notice how the dawn
draws colour to her just-kissed face.

8 April 2013 | 8:53 | No Comments


Albert Bartlett

The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function.

4 April 2013 | 12:57 | No Comments


Winston Churchill

On September 28 the fleet came safely to anchor in Pevensey Bay. There was no opposition to the landing. The local “fyrd” had been called out this year four times already to watch the coast, and having, in true English style, come to the conclusion that the danger was past because it had not yet arrived had gone back to their homes.

24 March 2013 | 10:01 | No Comments


Tom Stoppard

Milne: No matter how imperfect things are, if you’ve got a free press everything is correctable, and without it everything is concealable.
Ruth: I’m with you on the free press. It’s the newspapers I can’t stand.

19 March 2013 | 0:01 | No Comments


Lord Tennyson

Tho’ much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

17 March 2013 | 17:03 | No Comments


George Macdonald

That is always the way with you men; you believe nothing the first time; and it is foolish enough to let mere repetition convince you of what you consider in itself unbelievable.

10 March 2013 | 0:42 | No Comments


Dietrich Bonhoeffer

It is much easier for me to imagine a praying murderer, a praying prostitute, than a vain person praying. Nothing is so odds with prayer as vanity

24 February 2013 | 16:33 | No Comments


Once removed

Show this bold Prussian that praises slaughter, slaughter brings rout.

becomes

How his old Russian hat raises laughter, laughter rings out.

6 February 2013 | 0:43 | No Comments


Charles Handy

The McNamara Fallacy

The first step is to measure whatever can be easily measured. This is OK as far as it goes.

The second step is to disregard that which can’t be easily measured or to give it an arbitrary quantitative value. This is artificial and misleading.

The third step is to presume that what can’t be measured easily really isn’t important. This is blindness.

The fourth step is to say that what can’t be easily measured really doesn’t exist. This is suicide.

3 February 2013 | 10:48 | No Comments


H L Mencken (possibly)

When I hear artists or authors making fun of business men, I think of a regiment in which the band makes fun of the cooks.

2 February 2013 | 23:03 | No Comments


Richard Feynman

What is not surrounded by uncertainty cannot be the truth.

1 February 2013 | 0:13 | No Comments


Gustave Flaubert

Language is a cracked kettle on which we beat out tunes for bears to dance to, while all the time we long to move the stars to pity.

31 January 2013 | 14:01 | No Comments


Winston Churchill

of Charles de Gaulle

He looks like a female llama who has just been surprised in her bath.

16 January 2013 | 23:52 | No Comments


Thomas Traherne

News from a foreign country came
As if my treasure and my wealth lay there;
So much it did my heart inflame,
‘Twas wont to call my Soul into mine ear;
Which thither went to meet
The approaching sweet,
And on the threshold stood
To entertain the unknown Good.
It hover’d there
As if ‘twould leave mine ear,
And was so eager to embrace
The joyful tidings as they came,
‘Twould almost leave its dwelling-place
To entertain that same.

15 December 2012 | 19:04 | No Comments


C S Lewis

Adherents of Xmas are exhausted and overextended but Christmas worshipers are joyful. Are you rushing or feasting?

15 December 2012 | 1:04 | No Comments


C. S. Lewis

It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies.

29 November 2012 | 20:22 | No Comments


Samuel Johnson

What we hope ever to do with ease, we must learn first to do with diligence.

24 November 2012 | 15:33 | No Comments


Yehuda Amichai

The Place Where We Are Right

From the place where we are right
Flowers will never grow
In the spring.

The place where we are right
Is hard and trampled
Like a yard.

But doubts and loves
Dig up the world
Like a mole, a plow.
And a whisper will be heard in the place
Where the ruined
House once stood.

10 November 2012 | 22:20 | No Comments


John Rogers

There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year-old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.

29 October 2012 | 22:25 | No Comments


Hugh Kingsmill

The well-to-do do not want the poor to suffer. They wish them to be as happy as is consistent with the continued prosperity of the well-to-do.

20 October 2012 | 20:32 | No Comments


G K Chesterton

To be a failure may be one step to being a saint

11 September 2012 | 20:18 | No Comments


Hugh Kingsmill

People who can repeat what you are saying aren’t listening

10 September 2012 | 7:25 | No Comments